What we can learn from the world’s great cuisines about vegetarian eating

What we can learn from the world’s great cuisines about vegetarian eating

If there’s been a defining trend in nutrition in the past two years, it’s the idea of plant-based eating.

Some people think ‘plant-based’ means eating nothing but plants; it’s often used as a term to describe vegan eating. There are tons of plant-based proteins, plant-based snacks and plant-based restaurants around that go with that description. Some are wonderfully healthy; some seem less so.

But following a plant-based diet does not have to mean plant-only. Plant-based is just what it says on the tin: eating mainly plants. A plant-based diet can certainly be nothing but plants, but it doesn’t have to be; plant-based eating can also include small amounts of animal-based foods, or it can mean eating some meat meals and some meat-free meals.

In fact, this is the basis of most of the healthiest diets on the planet. Here are few things we can learn from the people who stay healthiest and live the longest in the world about how to do ‘plant-based’ right.

They eat mostly (but not only) plants

The Mediterranean diet has long been recognised as a super-healthy pattern of eating, and it’s a predominantly plant-based diet. But as anyone who’s eaten a lasagne or ossobuco (slow-cooked veal shanks) knows, Mediterranean eating often includes some foods of animal origins. The key is that this way of eating also includes a lot of whole, healthy plant foods, ranging from fresh vegetables and fruit to beans, nuts and whole grains.

They’re comfortable celebrating vegetables

Italians don’t eat ossobuco every day. They’re just as likely to embrace a tasty, meat-free bean soup, or a tomato-based pasta dish as they are a super-meaty one. Likewise, people in Greece might celebrate with charcoal-grilled lamb, but they love a super-colourful Greek salad too. And the healthy Japanese celebrate tofu and other soy foods regularly as well as fish and meat.

They love legumes

Those humble super foods – the lentils, peas, beans and chickpeas – are one plant food family that feature prominently in the diets of the world’s healthiest people. The Nicoyan community in Costa Rica – one of the ‘blue zones’ where people live long and thrive – call beans one of the ‘three sisters’ of the table (the others are corn and squash). People in Sardinia, which is famously home to a huge population of centenarians, enjoy a traditional bean soup regularly.

They embrace healthy fats

We all know the Mediterranean olive oil is a fat worth embracing. So are other plant-based fats found in nuts, seeds and avocados. And you don’t have to go full vegetarian to get these benefits; don’t forget the super-healthy omega-3 fats to be found in fish and seafood. Okinawa in Japan is another blue zone where people traditionally eat lots of plants, but also embrace fish. And in Ikaria, in Greece, people eat a Mediterranean diet of which a full 6% is olive oil and 6% is fish. Meat clocks in at 5%.

If you’re keen to include more plants in your life, the WOOP Balance box is based on ‘blue zones’ style eating. And if you want to take it further and try healthy vegetarian eating, even just a few days a week, try the WOOP Vegetarian box. Both options are designed to be balanced and nutritious; a perfect and convenient option for anyone looking to get more plants on their plate.

Interested in giving WOOP a try?

By nutrition expert – Niki Bezzant

Niki

Niki Bezzant is a writer, speaker and commentator who is passionate about food and health. Niki has been involved in the food media for 20 years. She was founding editor of Healthy Food Guide magazine, and is a columnist for the Herald on Sunday, the Monday Herald Be Well, and a frequent contributor to broadcast media. She is a proud ambassador for the Garden to Table  programme which helps kids learn how to grow, cook and share food. She is a member of the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative and a board member for the NZ Nutrition Foundation.

Easy ways to get protein without meat

Easy ways to get protein without meat

Protein has been big news in nutrition in recent years. I’m sure you’ve seen this reflected in the store shelves: protein balls and bars; protein-boosted yoghurt and milk; ‘high protein’ claims on packages of everything from cereal to beef jerky.

Protein is a super-important nutrient. It’s the building block of the body. We need it for growth and repair; it helps in the formation of muscles, hair, nails, skin and organs.

When our bodies are under extra stress – teenagers going through growth spurts; if we’re pregnant or breastfeeding; doing lots of activity or when we’re sick or injured – we need even more protein to keep that growth and repair going. Older people, too, need more protein in order to avoid losing muscle mass; a problem that can start to happen even as early as our 30s and 40s. 

Protein also makes us feel full and satisfied, meaning it plays an important role in regulating our appetites. It’s thought we humans are wired to seek out a certain amount of protein from our food, and we will keep eating until we hit that point. Eating foods high in protein, the theory goes, means we may naturally eat a bit less overall.

If we’re omnivores, it’s likely we get a good chunk of our protein from animal foods; mostly red meat, chicken and fish. For people looking to eat less meat and more plants, there can be the worry that cutting out that animal food might mean we’ll go short on protein.

In fact though, it’s easy to get plenty of good-quality protein in a vegetarian or vegan diet. Vegetarians who eat dairy and eggs will have no problems; both foods will give you a good protein boost, and the bonus is they’re versatile and delicious. I don’t know what I’d do without eggs or cheese, personally.

There’s also good protein to be had from plant foods. Look to legumes: lentils, chickpeas and beans can all add to your daily protein and make great meal bases. Again, these are versatile ingredients that can be taken in tons of different directions, from hummus to dhal. Nuts are another super-useful food that gives a protein boost and can be a snack or a meal component. And legumes and nuts are also full of fibre, adding to that satiety we need.

When we’re thinking about protein, keep in mind the whole day’s food. You’ll get small and larger amounts of protein from almost all the foods you eat; grains, seeds, nuts, legumes, milk, cheese, yoghurt, eggs, rice, pasta etc. They’ll all add up to a good amount every day, especially if you pay attention to eating as wide a variety of different foods as you can.

If you’re just dipping your toe into the waters of vegetarian eating, the team at WOOP has got you covered. The meals in their new Vegetarian box are all well-balanced and delicious and have plenty of protein, so you won’t have to think about anything but putting it all together and enjoying.

Interested in giving WOOP Vegetarian a try?

By nutrition expert – Niki Bezzant

Niki

Niki Bezzant is a writer, speaker and commentator who is passionate about food and health. Niki has been involved in the food media for 20 years. She was founding editor of Healthy Food Guide magazine, and is a columnist for the Herald on Sunday, the Monday Herald Be Well, and a frequent contributor to broadcast media. She is a proud ambassador for the Garden to Table  programme which helps kids learn how to grow, cook and share food. She is a member of the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative and a board member for the NZ Nutrition Foundation.

Support Local & Treat Locals with WOOP

Support Local & Treat Locals with WOOP!

Since WOOP started, we’ve been committed to giving back to those around us and are proud to support the Auckland City Mission & Kiwi Harvest on a weekly basis.

As we moved into Level 2 we thought our customers might be excited to get back to enjoying some delicious takeaways from local cafes and restaurants as they started to reopen.

We decided we would like to help support a number of local cafés and restaurants by buying 100 gift vouchers to help get them back on their feet. We also wanted to pass on these gift vouchers to 100 lucky WOOP customers for them to give to a local hero or someone in their community who deserves a treat.

We asked customers to nominate their local cafe or restaurant and someone in their community who deserves a treat.

We have been humbled by the number of responses received and are excited to announce the chosen nominations below, including the restaurant or cafe nominated and the customer who nominated the cafe or restaurant. The chosen nominations have been emailed the gift cards and can pass these onto the nominated person in their community who deserves a treat.

Chosen nominations for Support Local & Treat Locals with WOOP

Howick Village Cafe, Auckland – Marc M.
Chikos Restaurant, Lincoln Road Henderson – Yvonne W.
Good Local Pyes pa Tauranga – IAN N.
Dilly’s Cafe Onehunga – Muriel T.
Sponge drop @ Mount Managanui – Susan C.
Absolute coffee house Cambridge – Andrea D.
Vondel, Devonport – Tom P.
Five Loaves Cafe Devonport – Jennifer B.
Puff Cafe Orewa – Connie C.
The Cafe at Harrisons, Peka Peka. – Tricia M.
Tasca Orewa – Victoria H.
El Grecco. Campbells Bay. Auckland. – Cathy S.
Manly Bar & Grill – Jan H.
Postal service, Grey Lynn Auckland. – Sarah R.
Baker & Co. Glendowie, Auckland. – Heidi C.
Folk Tauranga – Brent G.
The Corner, Remuera – William M.
Bottega Deli, Berhampore, Wellington – Morag I.
Laneway Espresso, Christchurch – Sarah A.
Baker and co cafe Glendowie, Auckland – Liz B.
Rosa Cafe, Beachlands, Auckland – Kate v.
Henry & Ted Cafe, Papamoa Beach 3118 – Carole C.
Scout – Torbay – Mike B.
25ml Hobsonville point Auckland – Sharon  A.
Kind, Morningside, Auckland – Toni B.
Portofino Devonport Auckland – Moira C.
November Café (Mairangi Bay, Auckland) – Kristen I.
Le bakerman – Shelley M.
The Collins, Greenhithe, Auckland – Vicki B.
Peel to Pip, morningside, Auckland – Sarah C.
XCHC cafe, Christchurch – Susan S.
Munch, Palmerston North – Jo H.
Black Coffee – Wellington – Racheal R.
Cafe Lane, Paraparaumu Beach – John B.
Crave Cafe – Morningside, Auckland. – Tracy L.
Red Rabbit – Natasha H.
The Governor, Herne Bay (Jervois Road) – Alexandra S.
The General, Mount Maunganui – Ruth J.
Hayes Common Hamilton East – Graeme E.
Townmouse Pukekohe – Maleine V.
Postal Service Cafe, Auckland – anna b.
CBK Tauranga – Vanessa L.
Suburban Kitchen, Cambridge – Hayley C.
Puff Cafe, Orewa – Pip E.
Abracadabra – Constance L.
Loretta, Wellington – Renee  C.
Goldmine, Wellington CBD – Andrea  B.
The Candy Shop, Auckland – Yuna L.
Deli Bros, Hobsonville, Auckland – Maree B.
Tanto, Epsom, Auckland – Kim M.
Gratitude cafe at Mount Maunganui – Dani u.
Postal service – Anna L.
Spring & Fern Thorndon – Sue and Ray Cullis – Charlene  S.
Fools of Desire Cafe Rangiora (Canterbury) – Wendy d.
Little Things Coffee Shop – Glenfield – Kris M.
Cafe Chatz, Manurewa – Monique L.
Banh Mi Caphe – Hamilton – Melanie  F.
Black Coffee, Wellington – Sandra A.
Kawau Kitchen Auckland – Melanie P.
FILO Porirua – Tineke J.
Old Vicarage, Halswell, Christchurch – Jill B.
Altura cafe Albany Auckland – steve W.
Rosetta cafe Raumati Kapiti – Julie V.
Bahn mi Hamilton – Fiona S.
Moustache Milk and Cookie Bar Auckland – Abby K.
Sweet Vanilla, Lower Hutt – Melissa G.
Janus Bakkerij – Breigh S.
Love Rosie Bakery – 50 Ninth Avenue Tauranga – 07 928 1112 – Fiona H.
The Sugar Bowl – Kylie D.
A’ruma Long Bay – Michelle  M.
Red Eight Cafe – Kaiapoi – Sara A.
Ours Café, Mount Maunganui – Kate P.
Two Spoons, Arkles Bay, Whangaparaoa – Sharon R.
Off the track – Havelock North – Margaret W.
Crave Cafe, Auckland – Sophie H.
Siamese Doll – Hobsonville Point – Reuben M.
L & G’s Cafe , Stanmore Bay, Whangaparoa, Auckland – Sue M.
Crave Cafe, Morningside, Auckland – Miriam R.
Crave Cafe – sam s.
Little Elephants Cafe, Ellerslie, Auckland – Anne M.
Third Place Cafe, Rotorua – Stephanie C.
Paulo’s Milford Auckland – Colleen B.
Emperors New Clothes, Christchurch – Nicola A.
Hello stranger, auckland – Mark P.
Biskit, Parnell, Auckland – Judy R.
Wildflour Bakery – Palmerston North – Samantha N.
Central Deli Mount Maunganui – Debbie B.
Stafford Road Wine Bar, Northcote, Auckland – Steve B.
Cafe Dynasti Rotorua – Shona  D.
Corelli’s Devonport – Lorraine S.
Zelati Sweet Gastronomy – Wellington – Jennifer L.
The Birdwood Eatery Beckenham Christchurch – Marie D.
Bow and tie Ellerslie – Claire F.
L & G’s Kitchen – Donna S.
Ours Cafe. Mt Maunganui – Colleen  S.
Scoff – Hamilton East, Hamilton – Jo W.
All Day Trader, Westfield, Albany, Auckland – Lesley M.
Daily Mission, Eastridge shopping centre, Auckland – Simone B.
Cinnamon Cafe Hamilton – Rachel C.
Sweet Soul Patisserie, Christchurch – Carolyn M.

Thanks again to all those that nominated and for your help in Supporting Local & Treating Locals with WOOP.

Interested in giving WOOP a try?


How Meat-Free Meals Can Boost Your Health

How meat-free meals can boost your health

It’d be hard not to be aware that eating less meat is a bit of a trend. We’re seeing vegetarian and vegan restaurants, cookbooks and ingredients go mainstream, and lots of us have probably tried some of the new meat-free, plant-based proteins that are popping up everywhere from the local burger bar to the supermarket chiller.

While we shouldn’t think of meat-free eating as a shortcut to health – it’s equally possible to eat an unhealthy vegetarian diet as it is to eat an unhealthy meaty one – there are some good reasons why eating less meat, in a well-planned way, is a potential plus for our health.

You’ll eat more plants

If there’s one thing every nutrition expert worth their salt agrees on, it’s the fact that eating more plants is a great idea. Every one of us could probably benefit from doing this. That’s because plant foods are nutrient dense, and contain tons of things we know to be beneficial to our health, including vitamins, minerals, fibre and antioxidants. If you’re planning your meat-free meals well and including tons of whole, unprocessed vegetables, nuts, seeds, grains and legumes, then you’re going to give your plant intake a boost, and your health as well.

You’ll lower your risk of disease

Evidence suggests people who follow a vegetarian diet tend to be healthier: they have lower cholesterol and blood pressure and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases compared to those who eat meat.

Interested in giving WOOP Vegetarian a try?

You might lose weight

As above, you can still pack on the kilos eating a poorly-planned, junk-food vegetarian or vegan diet. But vegetarians who eat a mostly whole, balanced diet tend to have lower body weights. And because plant foods are full of fibre, they tend to make us feel fuller for longer, which can mean we steer away from overeating. Even if you’re just replacing a few of your meat-based meals with plant-based ones, you might find you drop a bit of weight.

You’ll get all the nutrition you need

You may have heard that if you don’t eat animal products, you could miss out on important nutrition; things like iron, calcium and protein. While this is possible – and vegans need to be especially careful, and usually need supplements of vitamin B12 to avoid deficiency – if you’re eating healthy and balanced meat-free meals, you’re going to get all the nutrients you need. Choose your protein carefully; for maximum nutrition it’s best to go for whole food sources like legumes, nuts and seeds rather than processed meat replacements.

So there’s really nothing to lose and lots to gain by giving meat-free eating a go. If you’re not too sure where to start or you’re short on inspiration, why not let someone else do the hard work for you, and try the new Woop Vegetarian box. It’s designed to be balanced and nutritious; a perfect and convenient option for vegetarians or anyone looking to get more plants on their plate.

Interested in giving WOOP Vegetarian a try?

By nutrition expert – Niki Bezzant

Niki

Niki Bezzant is a writer, speaker and commentator who is passionate about food and health. Niki has been involved in the food media for 20 years. She was founding editor of Healthy Food Guide magazine, and is a columnist for the Herald on Sunday, the Monday Herald Be Well, and a frequent contributor to broadcast media. She is a proud ambassador for the Garden to Table  programme which helps kids learn how to grow, cook and share food. She is a member of the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative and a board member for the NZ Nutrition Foundation.

Niki Bezzant: Health Hacks for your favorite takeaways at home

Health hacks for your favourite takeaways at home

Everyone loves a takeaway. Whether it’s that simple Kiwi favourite, fish and chips, or a more exotic offering from one of the many ethnic eateries we’re lucky enough to be able to choose from, there’s nothing like enjoying the tasty flavours of a meal someone else has prepared and delivered.

There’s no getting away from it, though: many of our takeout faves are health fails. The burgers, pizzas, curries and fries we love don’t always love us back, especially if we eat them several times a week. They can be stacked with refined carbohydrate, sugar, salt and saturated fat, often in the same deep-fried, salt-sprinkled packages. What’s more, the serving sizes of takeaways can be a lot larger than we need, and may not include many veges. All of which adds up to poorer health and potentially, weight gain.

If you’re thinking you’d like to cut down a bit on the takeaways, you don’t have to go cold turkey and give up everything you love. Not forgetting there are some super-tasty examples of these in the various WOOP boxes, it’s also possible to re-create healthier versions of your favourite takeaways at home.

Interested in giving WOOP a try?

Good old fish and chips

Let’s start with the good old fish and chips. A simple pan-fried fillet and some oven-baked fries is an easy meal to prepare. Change up the fries and add some other kinds of roasted veges – kumara or carrot, for example, and add a salad and you’ve got a much healthier version of the deep-fried favourite. There are some pretty good crumbed fish offerings in the frozen section of the supermarket, too; these can simply be baked in the oven and again, are typically healthier than a deep-fried fillet. For extra credit, make your own tartare sauce using a mix of mayonnaise, yoghurt, lemon and capers.

Burgers

Burgers, too, are a takeaway that’s simple to recreate in a healthier way. It’s easy to grate veges into your meat pattie mixture; try beetroot, carrot or courgette and mix it into the mince along with seasonings and egg. Choose grainy buns and add plenty of veges or slaw into your burger, and you’ll be doubling the vegetable content of your burger meal. If carbs are a concern, you can try making an open burger (just use half the bun) or make a ‘bunnice’ burger using large lettuce leaves instead of a bun.

Pizza

Pizza is another meal beloved by many of us, but often less healthy than we’d like. You can turn that around at home by making your own. Make your own base, if you’re really keen (it’s easier than you think) or use a pre-prepared base. Then load it up with veges: be creative here; it’s a great way to use up all the bits of veges you have lurking in the fridge. Top with cheese; use a super-tasty one like blue or parmesan and you won’t need to use too much.  A sprinkle of chilli flakes and some tasty olives gives you tons of flavour as well as health boost.

Interested in giving WOOP a try?

By nutrition expert – Niki Bezzant

Niki

Niki Bezzant is a writer, speaker and commentator who is passionate about food and health. Niki has been involved in the food media for 20 years. She was founding editor of Healthy Food Guide magazine, and is a columnist for the Herald on Sunday, the Monday Herald Be Well, and a frequent contributor to broadcast media. She is a proud ambassador for the Garden to Table  programme which helps kids learn how to grow, cook and share food. She is a member of the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative and a board member for the NZ Nutrition Foundation.

Niki Bezzant: Alcohol and health – Is a glass of wine a day good for you?

Alcohol and health: Is a glass of wine a day good for you?

Drinking alcohol is a habit that’s easy to get into. A glass of wine or a few beers after work; weekend lunches; late-night tipples. And there’s some common wisdom that moderate drinking is OK; maybe even good for us.

Alcohol is a habit, though, that may not be as benign as we’d like to believe. I’m not going to tell you not to drink. But if we want to indulge, we need to do it while being fully mindful of the facts.

To start with, drinking alcohol increases our risk for a range of diseases. It’s a Group One carcinogen; a known risk factor in seven different cancers. It also has links to heart disease, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes.

It’s true there have been studies that show moderate drinking can have health benefits.

The key there is the ‘moderate’ part. Usually what’s meant by that is very low indeed; one or two units of alcohol, at most, each day. A unit of alcohol is less than what we typically serve ourselves: it’s just 100ml wine, for example, or less than one bottle of beer. Measure it out some time at home to see just how little that is. It’s also not recommended to ‘save up’ those units and drink them all at once! That counts as a ‘binge’, and comes with its own harms.

Another thing that might make us think of moderating our drinking is the weight factor. Though we might think the issue with booze is carbs, it’s actually alcohol. Alcoholic drinks are packed with kilojoules; alcohol being second in energy density only to fat. So it pays to think of alcohol as food.

To demonstrate: drinking, say, three 180ml glasses of red wine or three 330ml bottles of cider will add nearly 2000kJ to your day. That’s the equivalent of eating nearly seven slices of white bread. Three 330ml bottles of lager has around 1500kJ — the equivalent of more than five slices of white bread — and three double gins with standard tonic has a whopping 2200kJ — the equivalent of nearly eight slices of white bread. If you wouldn’t add that kind of extra food to your day, it could be good to reconsider that second or third glass, too.

So how can we drink in a healthy way? A good rule to consider that keeps us inside healthy drinking guidelines is the ‘1-2-3’ rule. It goes like this: one drink a day (or) no more than two drinks at any one time; no more than three times a week. This is a nice, simple idea; it allows for mindful, moderate drinking without compromising health.

Interested in giving WOOP a try?

By nutrition expert – Niki Bezzant

Niki

Niki Bezzant is a writer, speaker and commentator who is passionate about food and health. Niki has been involved in the food media for 20 years. She was founding editor of Healthy Food Guide magazine, and is a columnist for the Herald on Sunday, the Monday Herald Be Well, and a frequent contributor to broadcast media. She is a proud ambassador for the Garden to Table  programme which helps kids learn how to grow, cook and share food. She is a member of the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative and a board member for the NZ Nutrition Foundation.

OUR PEOPLE

At WOOP we love what we do and especially what we eat!

We are a team of passionate foodies working hard to ensure our members can live their best night every night! Below we introduce you to some of our epic team so you can put a smiling face to their names.

MEET CHEF ZOE

Crazy good sauce maker!

When people talk about WOOP, they talk about two things; the delicious recipes and famous sauces. Introducing Zoe, your very own, outsourced simmer sauce-eress.

MEET CUSTOMER CHAMPION – PETRA

Has eaten in 28 countries!

Petra knows your name. Not in a weird way, just in the way that ensures your box arrives on your doorstep, on time. Petra has all the answers.

MEET FOUNDER – THOMAS

Thomas is passionate about dinner. Funnily enough, he’s even passionate about your dinner. To make it easy, delicious and in a fraction of the time. He had the dream and now he runs the team.

We hope you have enjoyed reading and getting to know more about our epic team of Foodies!

Interested in sampling our WOOP boxes?I

OUR LOCAL PRODUCERS

We believe in providing 100% natural locally sourced ingredients. We are proud to be a Kiwi business that believes in putting Kiwi businesses first. That’s why we are so excited to introduce you to our local producers.

LIVING FOODS – OUR SALAD GROWER

Living Foods is a family run horticultural business specialising in fresh cut salad greens located in Auckland. Their story started back in 1993 where their passion for all things fresh and green has seen them grow some of the best salads available to eat.

EAST ROCK – OUR FISHMONGER

East Rock is a family owned boutique fishery from Gisborne and have four generations’ experience fishing the East Coast. Their small inshore boats catch fish on short trips, to ensure it is delivered to you wharf side fresh. Every delivery can be traced back to the boat it was caught on and the area it was caught in.

Interested in sampling our fresh Kiwi Produce?

NEW ZEALAND QUINOA CO. – OUR KIWI QUINOA GROWERS

From paddock to plate, the New Zealand Quinoa Co. is a family business out to make a difference. Grown in the shadows of Mt Taranaki, their highly nutritious quinoa is both sustainably grown and spray free – and by being locally grown, has lower food miles and environmental impact than imported quinoa. Another great reason to support local businesses!

NZ HOTHOUSE – OUR TOMATO GROWERS

Our tomatoes are grown by NZ Hot House and use no nasty chemicals or sprays!

Our tomatoes are grown in Karaka by our friends Jason, Mark, Che and Gurwinder.

By growing tomatoes in a glasshouse, the team are able to capture natural energy from the sun which makes the process both eco friendly and extends the natural growing season.They also use no nasty chemicals, instead relying on ‘good bugs’ to control pests on the plants, meaning a healthier tomato and a happier customer!

ALPINE SALMON – OUR SALMON PRODUCER

Fast flows and highly oxygenated glacial water create Nature’s Finest Tasting Salmon.

Our Freshwater King Salmon are raised in the swift, cold currents of New Zealand’s Southern Alps. In this remote alpine environment, nature takes the lead. This means minimal human intervention – giving our salmon space to grow and thrive.

Our salmon are naturally healthy and are sustainably farmed without the use of nasty chemicals ; all key ingredients in creating delicious tasting salmon.

Interested in sampling our fresh Kiwi Produce?

AOTEAROA FREE RANGE EGGS Ltd – OUR FREE RANGE EGG PRODUCERS

Our eggs are supplied by Aotearoa Free Range Eggs Ltd, a sustainable, free range farm run by Garrie and Gill along with their 3 daughters, Abby, Megan and Charlie. The family purchased and converted the farm in 2014.

We hope you enjoy our free range eggs in your WOOP dishes and that you enjoying learning about where they come from!

OUR BOK CHOY GROWER

Our Bok Choy is grown in Pukekohe, known for its nutrient rich soil

Our bok choy is grown by a family run business on the outskirts of Pukekohe, a rural farming area south of Auckland well known for its fertile volcanic ash soil and rich vegetable growing history.  Established in 1900s, the farm is unique in their green approach to growing crops that are free of pesticides, while maintaining a positive impact on the environment.

Interested in sampling our fresh Kiwi Produce?

Niki Bezzant: How To Start (And Stick To!) Healthy Habits

Niki

Niki Bezzant is a writer, speaker & commentator who is passionate about food and health. Niki has been involved in the food media for 20 years. She was founding editor of Healthy Food Guide magazine, & is a columnist for the Herald on Sunday, the Monday Herald Be Well, & a frequent contributor to broadcast media. She is a proud ambassador for the Garden to Table  programme which helps kids learn how to grow, cook & share food. She is a member of the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative & a board member for the NZ Nutrition Foundation.

How to start (and stick to) healthy habits

Do you feel like it’s time to try and get a bit healthier? Eat a bit better? They’re common goals for many. And while we may feel highly motivated, it’s not always easy to get started and more importantly, keep going, beyond the first week or two. Here are some tips to help you make those healthy habits stick.

Have the right mindset (and goals) 

Before you start any healthy habit change, take a moment to check in with yourself and set some intentions. What are you hoping to achieve? How will you measure your success? And are your goals realistic? Weight loss, for example, is a goal for many, but we can have unrealistic expectations of how much and how quickly we’ll lose weight, so it pays to be realistic. (Nutritionists say half to one kilo a week is a good sustainable goal). Even better, make your goals about health instead: do you want more energy to run around with the kids? Maybe you want to feel less tired and not have an afternoon energy slump at the office? These are things you’ll be able to feel after a few weeks of eating well and looking after yourself better. 

Set up your environment 

Want to stop snacking on junky food? Get that food out of the house. Want to stop reaching for the wine the minute you get in from work? Don’t have a bottle waiting in the fridge. Tweaking your home and work environment can really help us change our habits.

Enlist friends and family

Tell the people around you about your goals, not to bore them with the details, but with the aim of getting their support. If others know you’re trying to be healthier, they might help you. And you might even inspire them to join in. 

Use a few life hacks

Don’t underestimate the power of planning and prep. Pre-chopping veges for healthy snacks; having healthy drinks chilled in the fridge and ready to drink; planning your lunches for the week and
making them each night – these are examples of small hacks that can take away the stress of having to make a choice when you’re hungry. So can meal kits like WOOP – you don’t have to think or make decisions; all you have to do is follow the directions and you know you’ve got a healthy meal in store. Don’t underestimate the power of planning and prep

Don’t be too hard on yourself

Don’t beat yourself up if you have a bad day and feel like you’re not sticking to your healthy habits. Remember: getting healthier is not a
destination, it’s a journey (and one that’s never finished)
. Small
changes you can keep going are better than big, drastic gestures that are too tough to stick to. 

Interested in giving WOOP a try?

Niki Bezzant: How To Make The Most of Your Snacks

Niki

Niki Bezzant is a writer, speaker and commentator who is passionate about food and health. Niki has been involved in the food media for 20 years. She was founding editor of Healthy Food Guide magazine, and is a columnist for the Herald on Sunday, the Monday Herald Be Well, and a frequent contributor to broadcast media. She is a proud ambassador for the Garden to Table  programme which helps kids learn how to grow, cook and share food. She is a member of the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative and a board member for the NZ Nutrition Foundation.

How to make the most of your snacks

Snacking is an eating behaviour most of us do to some extent. Globally, snacking has become part of our food culture.

There is a wide belief that we need a couple of snacks a day on top of our meals. The idea of ‘six small meals a day’ is also often promoted to help weight loss and health. It’s proposed that snacking boosts metabolism and helps us maintain stable blood sugar, as well as helping us eat less by stopping us from getting too hungry.

But do we really need to snack?

The research shows snacking can be both helpful and harmful to our overall health. It really depends on the quality and quantity of our snacks. If you’re a snacker, here’s how to make it work for you.

Check in with your hunger

People who are intuitive eaters know how to eat when they’re hungry, and not eat when they’re not. Sometimes we may snack due to social or psychological conditioning: just because it’s morning tea time or we feel low in energy or bored. Sometimes we might be better off getting up, getting outside and moving around to refresh ourselves rather than snacking. On the other hand if we’re in active jobs and we’re feeling hungry, a nutritious snack could be just the thing.

Go for whole foods

Our snacks are a great opportunity to get good nutrition in! If we go for whole, unprocessed foods, we’ll have a good chance of doing that. Fruit and veges make great snacks, especially if you can pair them with protein; a sliced apple with some cheddar cheese, for example, or a piece of fruit and a handful of nuts.

Don’t worry about ‘the rules’

A snack can be any type of food. If you want to have cereal and yoghurt in the afternoon, or a cup of soup in the morning, go for it. Chopped veges and hummus, edamame beans, nuts and seeds or hard-boiled eggs are great snacks, any time of day.

Watch for health halos

There are some good packaged snack options around, but also some making unwarranted health claims. Snack balls and bars may look and taste healthy – and some are – but some are packed with added sugar and calories. Claims of ‘raw’ and ‘organic’ are nice, but don’t mean anything, nutrition-wise. And beware of ‘no refined sugar’. There’s no official definition for this term, and unrefined sugar is just the same, to your body, as refined sugar is

Interested in giving WOOP a try?